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SoMeStatus pagereport explained

The SoMeStatus pagereport 2017 does a comprehensive analysis of your Facebook page, and give you an overview of what worked well and what you need to improve. The report will compare your pages results to other pages. If you have added a category to your page, the report will also compare your page to similar pages.

Here is an explanation to what each part of the report means, and how you can use it to get even more value from Facebook.

Reach

The color of the rectangles indicate how your page is performing.

The three rectangles on top of the report give an overview of how many people your Facebook posts reach.

Organic reach

Organic reach is the people that see your post because they follow your page or they have seen it directly on the page. SoMeStatus reports organic reach as a percentage of the number of people who like your page. That makes the organic reach comparable between pages regardless of size.

It is possible to have an organic reach higher than 100% because people who don’t like your page, but see your post directly on the page, also are reported as organic.

Due to the way Facebooks algorithm works, organic reach is a good way to measure the quality of your content. A high organic reach indicates that your followers likes your content. A low organic reach indicates that your followers ignores your content.

The rectangle with organic reach changes color depending on your pages performance. A green box means high organic reach (> 30%), a yellow box means average organic reach (15% to 30%) and a red box means low organic reach (< 15%).

Viral reach

Viral reach is the people that se your post because a friend interacted with it (liked, commented, shared etc.). Like organic reach, SoMeStatus reports viral reach as a percentage of the number of people who like your page.

The viral reach indicates how engaging your content is. High viral reach combined with high organic reach is perfect. That means your content is both engaging and relevant to your followers.

High viral reach and low organic reach indicates that you content is engaging, but not relevant to your followers.

Example: A funny cat-video will most likely be very viral, but unless you are in the cat-business, the viral reach will not be very valuable to your business.

The rectangle with viral reach changes color depending on your pages performance. A green box means high viral reach (> 100%), a yellow box means average viral reach (20% to 100%) and a red box means low viral reach (< 20%).

A note on Facebook Insights

The “organic reach” Facebook reports in Insights is actually the sum of your organic- and viral reach.

Postreach

Postreach is the actual number of people who see your posts on average.

Postreach is one of the key metrics you should track on Facebook. It shows exactly how many people get your content in their newsfeed.

A note on promoted posts

Organic-, viral-, and postreach does not include posts that are promoted (paid for). Promoted posts get artificially increased reach, and thus would make reach less accurate as a measure of quality.

Promoted posts are included in other parts of the report, where promotion does not impact the accuracy of the analysis (post type, engagement, click rate, video views etc.).

Postreach vs. pagelikes

Although the page has gained few new likes, the number of people who see the posts has more than doubled.

This diagram compares the number of people who have liked your page to the number of people who actually see your content.

Pagelikes has been one of the most prominent criteria for Facebook pages since the first page was launced in 2007. Unfortunately, the number of people who like a page says nothing about the number of people who actually see your content. A person who liked your page in 2012 and has ignored since will not get your posts in her newsfeed.

Postreach, however, is a measure of how many people actually get your posts in their newsfeed. Comparing that to the number of people who like your page show how well your page is developing over time.

If the postreach increases more than your number of page likes, it means you reach new followers and keep your existing followers engaged. You create good content!

If the postreach increase less than your number of pagelikes, it means that you reach new followers, but you aren’t able to keep them interested in your content.

If the postreach decreases, it means that neither your existing followers nor the new people you reach find your content interesting over time. You need to revise your content strategy!

Post types

See which post types you use and how they perform.

The table under post types shows how many posts you have shared of each type. The table also shows the organic- and viral reach of each post type.

The post type analysis ignores posts with zero reach. This may impact events, as Facebook changed the way they report reach of event posts in 2017. If SoMeStatus reports fewer event posts than you expected, this is probably the reason.

The table also show the reach for pages in the same category as your page and the average reach for all analysed pages.

If you have not assigned a category to your page, the category columns will be empty.

The pie chart shows the use of different page types for your page.

It is recommended to have a significant share of all the three main post types (link, photo, video) to reach the maximum number of users.

Your top reaching posts

A list of the three posts with the highest postreach. Promoted posts are not included.

Your top organic posts

A list of the three posts with the highest organic reach. Promoted posts are included.

Engagement pr. post

See how much engagement your posts get on average.

The number of likes, comments and shares each of your posts get on average.

Engagement pr. 1000 post views

This table is only available if you have a SoMeStatus Plus license for your page.

Compare the engagement on your page to other pages.

The table compares your engagement level to other pages. It shows the number of likes, comments and shares your posts get on average per 1000 views.

If you have not assigned a category to your page, the category columns will be empty.

Posts with links

This section is only available if you have a SoMeStatus Plus license for your page.

See how your posts with links performs.

This section analyses all posts that have a link to a web page. In addition to regular link posts, you can also create photo- and video posts with links in the text.

The analysis ignores posts with very few link clicks (< 5). This is to correct inaccuracies in the numbers Facebook reports (they sometimes report single link clicks on posts without a link in the text).

Posts with links is the total number of posts with links you have shared.

Total link clicks is the total number of times someone have clicked on your links.

Clicks per post is the average number of clicks on each post with a link.

Click rate is the share of post views that results in a link click. The click rate is a good measure of how efficient your Facebook posts are for driving traffic to a webpage.

If you have assigned a category to your page, your click rate is compared to other pages in the same category.

The chart shows how your click rate evolves.

The chart shows how your average click rate has evolved throughout the year. The grey line shows your average click rate for all posts with links. The blue, red and green lines show your average click rate for link-, photo- and video posts with links.

Videoposts

This section is only available if you have a SoMeStatus Plus license for your page.

See how well your videos are performning.

This section analyses your video posts. If you have assigned a category to your page, some of the numbers are compared to other pages in the same category.

Length of video is the average length in seconds of videos you have posted.

Views per video is the average number of views per video. Note that Facebook counts a “view” after only 3 seconds, so a “view” doesn’t necessarily mean that the user has actually watched your video.

Completed views is the share of the views that have watched the entire video. Theese are the people that have actually watched it to the end. This number (“completion rate”) can be a measure of the quality of your video. Note that longer videos normally have a lower completion rate than shorter videos.

Views with sound is the share of the views that were watched with sound on. Note that Facebook have started to show video with sound on by default in some instances, so an increase in this number is expected.

The chart scows how your completion rate and views with sound evolves.

The chart shows how the share of completed views and views with sound has evolved throughout the year.

Note on videos from YouTube and other external sources

If you post a link to a video on YouTube or another source outside Facebook the post will be reported as a video post, but no video data will be available. In SoMeStatus video posts from external sources are counted as video posts in the post type-analysis, but ignored in the videopost-analysis.

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